Articles by trialjournal


The Text Message Manslaughter

Written by: Sarah Meigs Member, American Journal of Trial Advocacy Michelle Carter, a twenty-year-old young woman from Massachusetts, found herself at the center of an involuntary manslaughter case that has made national headlines.1 The actions she took to get there were not done face to face, but, rather, over the…


An Unbiased Jury for Bergdahl?

By: Megan Seaton Member, American Journal of Trial Advocacy The recent surge in podcast popularity has familiarized many Americans with titles such as Serial[1] and S-Town[2]. Season Two of one fan-favorite podcast, Serial, reintroduced an already notorious name to American mainstream media: Bowe Bergdahl. The podcast depicts Bergdahl as a…


Criminal-funded Courts: Ethical or Not?

By: Laura Yetter Member, American Journal of Trial Advocacy Throughout the United States, many State and local governments struggle with limited budgets. As a result, some localities turn to their criminal courts as a key source of revenue; funding various State and local operations with fines and fees collected from criminal…


Paton v. GEICO, 190 So. 3d 1047 (Fla. 2016)—When Attorney Time and Client Billing Become Discoverable

By: Ranse Hare Senior Associate Editor, American Journal of Trial Advocacy The question of how far work-product privilege extends is one that can foster intense debate in courts across the country. While subject to exception, it is widely known that under federal law “documents and tangible things that are prepared…






Deadly Discrimination Exemplifies America’s Ongoing Capital Punishment Dispute: Buck v. Davis

Written by: Megan Seaton Member, American Journal of Trial Advocacy The death penalty is a polarizing topic of debate. It always has been, and likely always will be, a controversial moral dispute for many. Nonetheless, even those with basic legal knowledge agree that defense counsel should not knowingly offer evidence…